How would you describe your feminism in one sentence?

The exceedingly smart Aussie feminists have been answering the above question  and others online since October of last year, thanks to the woman who writes at Blue Milk (tag line: thinking + motherhood = feminist).   She’s been collecting the answers here, and she’s got a page of germane statements on the topic of feminist motherhood by various bright lights at her page,  About feminist mothers.

I ran across a recent response to her questions by an ever so clever lesbian mum, and I wanted to direct your attention to it, since one of my primary goals here is to provide proper nutrition for ever so clever lesbian mums (and them what love ’em).  Fly My Pretty (you’ll be missing something if you don’t take note of her URL) has said many intriguing things, some of which I can’t help but quote below (the better to tempt you over to her post):

Motherhood is making me much more conscious of my feminism. After so many years, it’s kind of just been running in the background, but seeing the impact – already – of patriarchy, homophobia and misogyny on my two little people re-politicises me.

Motherhood involves creating people, creating the next generation. There is no way around it, we are actively shaping who these little people are to become. Confident, thinking, critical and creative or mindlessly accepting the status quo – everything I do with them now, every interaction I have with people around me models how the world is for them and how they will engage with it.

I do think it is easier to be a lesbian mother and a feminist than a heterosexual one. Many of the struggles other women have about division of household and childrearing labour and valuing of mothering vs working out of home take on a different flavour when sex roles are taken out of the picture.

Interested?  G’wan over and read her whole post in its entirety. 

1 thought on “How would you describe your feminism in one sentence?”

  1. I agree that,
    “Many of the struggles other women have about division of household and childrearing labour and valuing of mothering vs working out of home take on a different flavour when sex roles are taken out of the picture.”
    My partner and I have often commented that we are lucky to be free from assumptions about who does what and what it’s worth. We both do some cash earning and childcare and work it all out as we go along. When we first had kids I was astonished to find lesbian couples who slipped into tight little roles based on who had given birth and who brought home the wage packet, so I think we all need to be aware of what we’re doing.

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